guide flies

  • By: Kelly Galloup
  • Photography by: Louis Cahill
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The first time I took a fly pattern to a manufacturer was back in 1980, and since then I’ve submitted many, many more. For me it was a relatively easy process because there were very few people submitting new patterns at that time; now, as an established fly designer (and a shop owner for more than 30 years) it’s even less of a chore.

Project

  • By: Zach Matthews
  • Photography by: Zach Matthews
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I NEARLY TRIPPED OVER the shed antler, one side of what had been an impressive 10-point whitetail buck’s rack. It was concealed in the leaf litter, slightly mossy and gnawed a bit by rodents (probably squirrels), but it was still beautiful. I zipped it into my pack and continued hiking up the Appalachian creekside trail, following the blue blazes and yelling for my buddy James to “Wait up!”

Personal History

  • Photography by: Brian O'Keefe
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Sometimes things work out. And sometimes they don’t. All right, picture this, ALMOST than 25 years ago: I’m the newly minted associate editor of this magazine (at the time, it was still called Rod & Reel, the Fly coming later). I’m newly married. I’m on my honeymoon. To top it off, my wife and I are spending that honeymoon in Belize, for our first flats fishing experience.

Short Casts

  • By: Brent Prettyman
  • Photography by: Brent Prettyman
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>Northeast Utah’s Green River harbors up to 20,000 trout per mile; thanks to flushing flows in 2011 those fish are now feeding on improved aquatic insect hatches and growing fast.

Short Casts

  • By: Will Rice
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>If you have ever watched a permit suddenly appear on a flat, bob in a gentle wave for a moment and quickly disappear into deeper water without a trace, you know the deal—permit are confounding.