My Kind of Despair

  • By: Troy Letherman
  • Photography by: Greg Thomas
Road

This makes no sort of sense. In fact, referring to it as fishing is a terrible joke, responsible only for the mistaken idea that you’ll actually touch one (a fish) at some indeterminate point in the future. Angling masochism is a bit closer to the mark.

Taster's Guide to Mayflies

  • By: Jim Dean
  • Photography by: Cathy Beck
  • and Barry Beck
Green Drake

When a young friend, Cody Cantwell, ate a baby green drake (Ephemerella drunella flavilinea) while we were fishing the Railroad Ranch stretch of the Henry’s Fork in Idaho last June, I asked him, “Why?”

“I just wanted to see what it tasted like,” he replied, a bit sheepishly. “These big rainbows love Flavs, and I was curious to see what the big deal is.”

The Thunderdome

  • By: Skip Morris
  • Photography by: Skip Morris
The Thunderdome

Recently i delved online, then perused my substantial fly-tying library, trying to find some sort of attractor-emerger fly pattern. I failed, and that surprised me—there are thousands of attractors and emergers in existence, but those are all nymphs, streamers or dries. Never a combination of the two.

Steve Laurent's Alaskan Perspective

  • By: Bob White
  • Photography by: Steve Laurent
Alaskan Bush Plane

There’s a certain spark in great artwork that’s difficult to define, and hard to ignore. The photography of Steve Laurent has that fire.

Laurent works in black and white with a wide-angle lens to record the everyday lives of bush pilots and fishing guides at Bristol Bay Lodge, in southwest Alaska. His images are honest, stark and gritty, reminiscent of Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans’ photographs of the Great Depression.

10,000 New Anglers A Year

  • By: Mike Conner
  • Photography by: Tom Rosenbauer
Girls Fishing

Grow fly-fishing.

That’s the mantra of the fly-fishing industry, which has admittedly been flat since the A River Runs Through It electricity died sometime in the 1990s.

Fly-fishing growth would provide multiple benefits, and not just to a manufacturer’s, retailer’s or guide’s bottom line. More fly fishers, in fact, could increase fish-habitat and fisheries-resource stewardship, and that means more quality water and desirable fishing for all of us. Unfortunately, growing fly-fishing may be the single most difficult task the industry has, and nobody seems to have a clear answer on how to get newbie anglers onto the water and enjoying rewarding outings.