Trout at the End of the World

  • By: Sebastian Hope
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Argentina's Rio Irigoyen is one of the angling world's newest options for trophy sea-run brown trout.

Time Away from Time

  • By: Greg Thomas
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Midway through 2009, I couldn’t complain about the angling year. I started in January chasing sea-run cutthroats around Washington’s Puget Sound, and then migrated north to the Queen Charlotte Islands for steelhead. By April I was throwing Spey on the Skagit River and shortly after, I was doing the same in Oregon on the North Umpqua. Right after that I headed to Maine for landlocked Atlantic salmon. In May I was in southeast Alaska putting the smackdown on more sea-run cutthroats and steelhead, along with some meaty dolly varden.

Dries When the Snow Flies

  • By: Chad Mason
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"On spring creeks and tailwaters throughout the country, some of the year’s best and loneliest dry-fly action happens from December through late winter."

Greatest of All Time

  • By: E. Donnall Thomas
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Are steelhead to fly-fishing what Mohammad Ali was to boxing?

The Secret Life of Walter Troutty

  • By: R. C. Hooker
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"Walter looked at the Lucite containers of pelts and parts surrounding him like circles of ice. The fur and hair ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous—antron, kip tails, hare hair, micro mink, monkey pelt and yak."

2009 Traver Award Winner: The Land Beyond Maps

  • By: Pete Fromm
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The 2009 Robert Traver Fly-Fishing Writing Award Winning Story: "She casts again, the backcast too low, almost onto the rocks, but there’s only beach back there. This time she strips too fast, the fly skittering across the water, which is all the trout needs to bust after it like some hog bass. Totally hooks itself."

Mousing Around in Alaska

  • By: Greg Thomas
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Unforgettable is the way anglers describe a good day of mousin’ when big rainbows rise to the surface, often in a splashy, all or nothing style; these fish aren’t just trying to sip in a mouse, like a Montana rainbow might lip-kiss a PMD, they’re trying to kill it. They have to react that way because Alaska provides some of the harshest winter conditions in the world and those fish need every ounce of protein they can get.

Cover Stories

  • By: Joe Healy
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The front cover is the face of a magazine. The façade. The entryway. Done well, through the image chosen and the cover lines written, it’s the summation of not only the pages to follow; but the feeling of the magazine. The cover strikes a nerve, triggers an impulse and arrests our attention. It causes the reader to pause after shaking the magazine free from the mail pile—or, to the enduring satisfaction of we editors and art directors who create these canvases, convinces a customer to buy this magazine from a retailer. More than a mere cloak, a cover is the magazine’s personality. Here, we went back to our beginnings, March/April 1979, marched through the decades and selected some of the most engaging of the past 178 FR&R front covers.

Creative Solutions

  • By: Tom Keer
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From 1929 to today, Winston has based its business on designing and building quality fly rods for specific angling situations.

Simple Gifts

  • By: Yvon Chouinard
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FR&R’s 2009 Angler of the Year declares his move toward ultimate simplicity, on and off the water.