Biot Hendrickson

Biot Hendrickson

I have taught this pattern in a number of fly-tying classes for my Eastern friends, and all agree-it's a killer.

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When I lived in Michigan, I always looked forward to opening day of trout season and the possibility of a Hendrickson hatch on a couple of my favorite streams. The first time I witnessed this hatch, I was disappointed because none of the patterns I had tied from books and magazine articles, or purchased in fly shops, looked anything like the naturals on the water. So I devised my own idea of a Hendrickson dun that has worked extremely well wherever this hatch occurs. I have taught this pattern in a number of fly-tying classes for my Eastern friends, and all agree-it's a killer.

Recipe:

Hook: Mustad 79580, size 12 and 14
Thread: Danville Beige 6/0 pre-waxed Read More »
Tail: Medium dun spade (or Coq de Leon) fibers
Underbody: Medium dun rabbit dubbing
Overbody: Dyed medium dun wild turkey biot. Dye with Rit Pearl Gray to match the color of a stripped peacock herl
Wings: Pair of medium hen hackle tips
Hackle: Medium dun saddle hackle

Tying Instructions:

  1. Attach the tying thread one hook-gap distance behind the eye, wind to the end of the shank, clip off the tag, take one or two turns over the last turn to create a tiny thread bump and tie in the tail, which should be as long as the entire hook. Lift the tailing butts and clip them off exactly where you started the thread and leave the thread hanging.
  2. Dub a short-firm body beginning at the thread starting point. Create a dubbed underbody that is one hook size smaller than the hook you are using-a size 14 body on a size 12 hook, for example. Leave enough space near the tail to tie in the biot by its tip on the thread wraps holding the tail.
  3. Tie in the biot by its tip, wind it forward and tie it off in front of the shoulder of the body.
  4. Tie in the hen hackle tip wings in front of the shoulder of the body, saving enough space between the shoulder and the wings for at least three turns of hackle.
  5. Tie in the hackle in your favorite manner and wind at least three turns behind the wings and three turns in front of the wings. I like to end with a hackle distribution that is one-third behind and two-thirds in front of the wings.