Presentation

Presentation

  • Photography by: Jeff Edvalds
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Photographer: Jeff Edvalds
Subject: Florida’s Big Pine Key is one of the world’s premier places to jump big, migratory tarpon, which is exactly what Keys guide Bruce Chard did here. The problem? This fish is coming unhinged during the strip-set and subsequent head thrashing. If you look closely, just to the right of the fish, you may see Chard’s yellow tarpon fly sailing through the air. If you fish tarpon at all, there will be a day when you star in this scene . . . and expect it to be a pale moment in your angling history. Because the ratio of hookups to landed fish is so low on tarpon, most guides and anglers consider a jumped “poon” to be nearly as good as a landed fish, and we expect that Chard had a pretty good grin on his face after losing this one.
According to the photographer, on this mostly overcast and windy day the tarpon weren’t too willing to eat, due to clouded water. “Most of the time,” Edvalds said, “we had fish nearly bouncing off the boat before we spotted them.” The consolation prize? Edvalds snapped this iconic moment and shared it with us.
Specs: Nikon D700 camera body; 17-35mm Nikkor lens; manual exposure f/8 @ 1/1250; ISO 200
TECHNIQUE: Not knowing where the tarpon might move after being hooked, Edvalds set the camera with a relatively deep depth of field while maintaining a fast enough shutter speed to freeze motion in the available light.

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