Cortland Dyna-Tip LInes

Cortland Dyna-Tip LInes

Plus, A convenient strike indicator and a beefed-up saltwater line

  • By: Buzz Bryson
  • and Paul Guernsey
Cortland 555 Precision Dyna-Tip Fly Lines Having been out of the serious fly-fishing game for a while (long story), I naturally jumped at editor Paul Guernsey's invitation to check out a new outfitting operation in Chile. The December weather was generally cold, wet and windy--not great conditions to test light to medium fly lines. But I did get one reasonably settled, and almost sunny, afternoon to play along a steep bank of the Rio Yelcho, casting a Stimulator up-current and getting to know again the special kind of contentment I feel when I'm watching a dry fly drift over water I just know holds trout.I was slinging a brand-new 5-weight Cortland Precision Dyna-Tip Trout line, with a six-foot high-floating tip. I had loaded it on my favorite trout rod, a 9-foot 4-weight that generally needs a 5-weight line to prod it into action. The new Dyna-Tip has what Cortland calls its Rocket 2 taper, with weight concentrated toward the line's tip to ease loading of fast fly rods. It seemed to me that the 5-weight line loaded that 4-weight rod almost too well; I have a feeling the 4-weight would have been the perfect line for the rod. Cortland says the six-foot tip floats higher than other lines. Impossible to say in my short test (I find that it's after a period of hard use that fly lines begin to let you down in this regard), but I certainly couldn't complain from my time with the line. It cast well, floated high and dry and caught me some fish, but I do think a 4-weight line would have best matched my rod. Cortland makes the Precision Dyna-Tip Trout line in WF 4- through 7-weights (all floaters); $62. --Jim Butler RIO Kahuna Twisty Strike Indicator&Tropic Outbound Line Strike indicators have made better fishermen (well, better-catching fishermen) out of many of us. Getting the best out of strike indicators requires they be used like split-shots: add some, take some off, move them up the line/leader, move them down. As the water depth and speed changes, so should the strike indicator. Thus, probably the biggest reason more anglers don't use them, or those who do don't use them more often, is that they're aggravating to use. Some are sticky and not very adjustable, others have to be slipped on before the fly is tied on, or they require fiddling with a toothpick, or some rubber band-like connector. In the interest of making your nymph fishing less aggravating, RIO has continued to evolve its Kahuna strike indicators, and the latest version might just be the best. The Kahuna Twisty is simply a fat-diameter length of low-density (thus high-floating) fly-line-like material. The key to its easy use is that it has a small-diameter wire running through its center. Simply snip a section off (it cuts easily) and wrap it snugly around your leader, or your line--anywhere. It's that easy, and that quick. The Kahuna Twisty comes packaged in 18-inch lengths, enough for quite a few strike indicators. One color, chartreuse, is to my thinking the best single color for strike indicators. $4.95. As for the new, improved version of the Outbound line, RIO has incorporated a harder saltwater coating and its Powerflex core to create the Tropical Outbound. The new line retains the Outbound's great casting properties in sweltering tropic temperatures. The line comes in two versions, one a floater and the other an intermediate-head, floating running-line. The floater has a sky-blue head and tan running line. The intermediate has a clear tip, translucent blue head and blue running line. All incorporate RIO's welded loops. $69.95. --Buzz Bryson Scientific Anglers Dry Tip Technology fly line Today's floating fly lines generally float extremely well--except, sometimes, for the very tip, where the buoyant coating tends to be thinner than elsewhere on the line. Scientific Anglers has addressed that problem with its new Dry Tip Technology (DTT). By seamlessly blending two different-density coatings, SA has produced lines with a low-density tip, which provides higher floatation. In getting the job done, Bruce Richards, a stickler for lines that cast well, wasn't about to sacrifice any casting qualities. He used a "mass profiling" process to ensure that energy is transmitted smoothly down the line, so that the casting loop unrolls smoothly, with no bumps or wiggles--assuming the angler does his part. The DTT is offered in selected Mastery Series GPX, Trout and Nymph lines. The GPX lines with DTT (3-6 weight) have camo-color tips, and the Nymph tapers incorporating DTT (4-8 weight) have orange. SA has also incorporated welded-tip Streamline Loops into all the DTT lines. I examined a number of the new SA lines with these loops, and they were cleanly welded and very compact, a feature light-line fly rodders (with their smaller rod guides) will appreciate. Of course, those not preferring loops can simply snip them off and knot their leader on. The Streamline Loops are also available on standard Mastery GPX and Trout tapers. $59.95. --Buzz Bryson