Loon UV Wader Repair

Loon UV Wader Repair

Let the sun shine in

  • By: Buzz Bryson
If you can't remember spending nights between fishing days patching waders-roughing the surface, putting a coat of adhesive on, letting it get tacky, and then applying the patch, hoping it would hold and be watertight-you're lucky. Many of us who do remember are fortunate if we could relate a particular patch to a trip where fishing was memorable, and not just to the numbness in our feet that too often ended our fishing. Waders have improved. Who, 30 or 40 years ago, could have envisioned the tough breatheable fabrics in use today (and the light, warm, waterproof fabrics to wear under them!)? But even the best of waders today are not completely immune to the well-aimed thorn or the strand of barbed wire that wasn't quite as low as we thought when we stepped over it.Punctures and tears still happen. And while patches have gotten better, the improvements have been at best incremental. The introduction of Loon UV Water Repair is a technological improvement on a par with the coming of breatheable waders. It's that good. No longer do anglers have to last out the day with leaking waders, hoping to be able to get a patch to adhere to the damp material that night. Instead, when a leak occurs, they can simply dab a bit of Wader Repair on the hole, let the sun shine on it, and within seconds, have waterproof waders again. The stuff clings like a tick, and it works so well and so quickly that you really don't even have to take your waders off, or even dry them. It does work best when one heeds the fine print: Apply the Wader Repair indoors or at least in the shade. Then, hit it with full sunlight-house lights just don't produce the adequate UV light needed to cure the Wader Repair. If it's dark or rainy and you can't wait for the sun to shine, you'll want to have the Loon UV Mini Lamp. It's not cheap, at $15, but it works great, curing the material in half a minute or so. Plus, it's small and will fit handily in the tiniest wader pocket. (Alternately, you can slip into a booth at the local tanning salon for a few minutes and collect some rays on your freshly patched waders to set the adhesive. And no doubt generate some interesting conversation). Wader Repair worked so well on a couple of pinholes on my current waders, I decided to try and find some it didn't work on. I dug out several other waders of differing materials and stations in life. I applied the Wader Repair to the material, cured it and tried a couple of torture tests. First, I just rubbed the patched area with my palm, more or less simulating the wear a patch on the inseam of waders would experience during walking. Then, I just went after it, trying to pick it off with a fingernail. I'll have to say, one shouldn't think of this as a temporary fix. It is quick, but the stick is permanent. Because it is so simple and easy, you'll not hesitate to use it either. And when you're not fretting about wet socks and undies, or numb toes, you'll concentrate better on that strike indicator or dry fly, and find yourself catching more fish. Thanks, Loon Outdoors, for making our fishing better.