Skills

Streamers on Calm Waters

  • By: Dave Hughes
Streamer On Calm Waters

I fished the yamsi ranch last spring, in the sparsely settled and flat pine-forest country of southern Oregon, with owner John Hyde. John grew up on the ranch. He raises range-fed beef when he’s not involved in his first love, guiding folks on his home waters. He’s tall, slender; his hat and mustache are both broad.

The Magic of the Adams

  • By: A. K. Best
  • Photography by: A. K. Best
The Magic of the Adams

Why an article about the Adams? Because I recently rediscovered the Adams as a lifesaver during what could otherwise have been a very frustrating day.

A few weeks ago, my friends Mike Clark and John Gierach invited me to fish some trout ponds not far from Boulder, Colorado that had been stocked with some rainbow/steelhead hybrids several years ago. We’ve fished these ponds several times over the past few years and knew the trout were large, very strong, extremely fast and would eagerly rise to midges. It was mid-April, so we assumed that midges would be the order of the day. I packed fly boxes loaded with midge adult, emerger and larva patterns in all the colors that had been successful in the past.

The Feathered Wizardry of Dr. Tom

  • By: Darrel Martin
  • Photography by: Darrel Martin
Dr. Tom Whiting

Tom Whiting was born and spent much of his childhood in Denver, Colorado. The Whiting clan admits that Dr. Tom must be some strange agrarian throwback. From youth he was fascinated by fowls, and their variety. When Tom was about 10 years old, a lucky break: His family moved to the suburbs, where he raised a few chickens, peddled eggs in the neighborhood and worked on a game-bird farm. Although he spent hours dreaming up breeding programs, there were no plans to become a feather merchant; when it was time to go to college he delved into music, political science and literature at Colorado State University. One day his older brother asked him what he really wanted to do. Tom replied that he often thought about quail. Avian science was the answer. After getting a bachelor’s degree in avian science at Colorado State and completing genetics internships with two poultry producers, he knew he wanted more.

Brown Stone Nymph

  • By: A. K. Best
  • Photography by: A. K. Best
Brown Stone Nymph Fly

When there is no hatch coming off the water, none is predicted, there hasn’t been one in days and I have the chance to do a little fishing, my favorite go-to fly is the Brown Stone Nymph. I always look for a stretch of water that is boulder-strewn with fast-running water between the rocks. It’s usually the place where some big brown trout are hanging out near the bottom just waiting for a fat, juicy mouthful. The thought process here is: “They have to eat, don’t they?”

Feather Facets

  • By: Darrel Martin
  • Photography by: Darrel Martin
Adams Fly

“There is an expression in wine tasting that a fine wine must ‘blossom in the mouth and spread out its peacock tail.’ The metaphor that connects feather with wine is not all hyperbole. The finest feather is the rich, full-bodied and mature feather. The feather connoisseur recognizes the sweet, rich mahogany of coachman brown and the cool, dry flavor of a light Cahill. A warm and subtle bouquet of light explodes as it passes through a fine hackle. After all, the birth of a fly begins with a delicious hackle.”

The Ready Position

  • By: Chico Fernandez
  • Photography by: Chico Fernandez
Assume the Ready Position

The most frustrating part of fishing the saltwater flats with a fly rod, especially for someone new to this part of our sport, is the casting. I find that most new fly-casters, and even some intermediates, don’t like to practice away from the water; they feel it’s too much work. And it is a bit of work, at the beginning, but once we bypass that entry-level stage with saltwater tackle, say to the intermediate and up levels, casting is no work at all. Rather, it’s pure pleasure. Personally, I love to cast.

School Matters

  • By: Kathy Scott
  • Photography by: Kathy Scott
Lawrence High Fly-fishing Club

Fly Fishers always have the same reaction. When I say, “We offer fly-fishing to all 8th graders in phys-ed classes. And I’m the co-advisor of the Varsity Fly Fishing Club at the high school,” that news sinks in for a minute. Then they always say, “Wow, I wish I’d gone to your school!”

Spring Bonus: The Living Flies of Kelly Galloup

  • By: Greg Thomas
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In the Spring 2010 issue of Fly Rod & Reel, Montana-based streamer maniac Kelly Galloup talks about the designs of his living streamer flies (the Sex Dungeon is seen here):

Spreading Tenkara

  • By: Fly Rod and Reel
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San Francisco’s Daniel Galhardo is the country’s leading proponent of tenkara. "Tenkara is a form of fly-fishing that originated in the mountain streams of Japan. It has a very long history. Some speculate that it goes back at least some 400 years. Tenkara was practiced by professional anglers in the mountain villages of Japan."

Get the Float Line

  • By: Darrel Martin
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AUTUMN WEB BONUS: A sidebar on building a fly that accomplishes the right float line...From the "All About…Hackle" department in the Autumn 2010 issue.