Skills

guide flies

  • By: Kelly Galloup
  • Photography by: Louis Cahill
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The first time I took a fly pattern to a manufacturer was back in 1980, and since then I’ve submitted many, many more. For me it was a relatively easy process because there were very few people submitting new patterns at that time; now, as an established fly designer (and a shop owner for more than 30 years) it’s even less of a chore.

Angler of the Year: Chris Hayes

  • By: Chris Santella
  • Photography by: Jim Klug
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On arrival for my first visit to Belize’s Turneffe Atoll, I stepped off the boat a little dazed, partially from a long day of travel from the West Coast, and partly from the six or so Belikin beers I’d consumed en route. After fishing my laptop out of the drink (a result of those aforementioned Belikins), I shamefacedly shambled toward the main lodge where I was greeted by a short, trim gringo with a soft voice and even quieter demeanor—Craig Hayes, Turneffe Flats’ proprietor.

Practical and Useful

  • By: Dave Hughes
  • Photography by: Dave Hughes
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p>THE LATE POLLY ROSBOROUGH, AUTHOR OF Tying and Fishing the Fuzzy Nymphs, always declared that the biggest trout remain beneath the surface throughout a hatch, no matter how heavy, feeding on immature insects staging along the bottom or on their way toward the top for emergence. It makes sense: Insects are more vulnerable to interception then, and trout are less exposed to predation from birds and beasts, including you and me.

An Angle On Art

  • By: Bob White
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Most sporting art, especially angling art, has a practical purpose or function. Painters, photographers and printmakers try to capture a moment in time and preserve memories. Sculptors recreate objects cherished by anglers, be they fish or fly. Rod makers, net makers, boat builders and fly tiers create the tools with which we pursue our passion.

The Quest For Cree

  • By: Thomas Whiting
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The cree cape is a vibrant tweed, splashed with tints of red, white and black. Finding the origin of the term “cree” is nearly as difficult as finding a quality cree. Apparently, the truncated word was, at times, applied to creel. Creel (or crele), a label given to a rare Old English game fowl, is a bicolor hackle with white and red bars. Today we call the creel color a ginger grizzly. Evidently, through time the cree became a tricolor, a creel with black bars. Cree is a coloration, rather than a breed of bird. A simple description has worked in fly-tying: A cree is a tricolored hackle, with red and black on a white ground.