Gear

Fishpond Offers Three New Waistpacks

Fishpond carved a name for itself making great angling-specific bags and this year they've gone back to the well with three updated new designs.

 

Fishpond Nimbus Guide Pack

The Nimbus Guide Pack is a monster hip bag with enough space to stash a jacket, fly box (and heck, probably even a sleeping bag!)  Retailing for $109, it's intended for serious all-day angling in places where weather might change rapidly.

Sage Announces New "ONE" Fly Rod

While most manufacturers tend to wait for the yearly trade show to unveil their new offerings, Sage took the covers off a little early this year with the new fast-action, ultralight "ONE" series of rods.

 

Sage One Series

IFTD Trade Show

  • By: Greg Thomas
2011 IFTD Show

Fly Rod & Reel Offers Live Coverage from IFTD New Orleans

It’s the end of Summer and that means one thing to the fly-fishing industry and the people who make and sell all the gear we love—it’s time for the International Fly Tackle Dealer Show in New Orleans.

This trade-only show should perk the interest of every fly-fisher on the planet because this is where all the new gear for the upcoming season is first revealed… months before you’ll see it in a local fly shop. At IFTD, writers and photographers also get their first look at that product and have an opportunity to separate the great from the good and the good from the bad.

New Gear

  • By: Darrel Martin
  • and Buzz Bryson
Korkers Chrome Wading Boot

Years ago Dave Whitlock, a doyen of American fly-fishing, trudged toward the beaver ponds on Montana’s Big Hole River. The glorious day promised tight tippets. As he clambered through thick brush, Dave’s elastic-tethered net snagged. He did what we all do: He kept walking, waiting for the net to pull free. It did not. He turned around just in time to receive the net between his eyes. After regaining consciousness, he gathered his spiteful net and continued on his way with two black eyes.

See Through Water

  • By: Ted Leeson
  • Photography by: Greg Thomas
Sunglass Field Test

If there’s another piece of fishing equipment that serves as useful a range of functions as sunglasses, I am unaware of it. Good glasses defend your eyes from careening hook points and the large-caliber metal ordnance increasingly found at the end of a leader these days. They shield your eyes from the ultraviolet (UV) rays linked to such delightful prospects as cataracts and macular degeneration. Sunglasses reduce eyestrain and increase comfort in retina-searing sunlight and enhance vision on hazy or overcast days. And they allow you to see things with greater definition—important things, such as your fly on the water, the structure of the bottom, fish. Throw in the ancillary coolness factor and you have a pretty advantageous package, particularly for something that sits, largely unnoticed, on your nose.

Foreign Tied

  • By: Zach Matthews
  • Photography by: Greg Thomas
Foreign Tied Flies

“DEAR SIRS,” the e-mail started, “My name is Reginald Kibugi, and I am seeking to sell you excellent-quality fishing flies.” My cursor hovered over the Spam button, but the next line made me hesitate: “My asking price is $3 per dozen.” That’s a quarter a fly. Was this a good deal? A bad deal? I didn’t know, and chances are, you’ve received similar e-mails, if not this very one, and you don’t know either.

In order to answer that question, you have to know a bit about the world of commercial fly-tying, and that means you need some history. Back in the 1970s, an American professional fly tier named Dennis Black was driving from shop to shop to peddle his wares. On one of his long road trips across the West, he had an epiphany: He might be better off supervising other tiers than doing all the work on his own.

Sinking Lines in the Salt

  • By: Chico Fernandez
  • Photography by: Louis Cahill
  • and Chico Fernandez
Sea Trout

Going fishing is an adventure, and no matter how long you’ve fished, you never know what awaits you. And this is part of the thrill, sometimes.

Once, on a flight to Belize, I looked down and all I saw were whitecaps, even on the shallow flats. A few minutes later we were on the small island of Ambergris Caye; the wind that met us had to be over 20 miles per hour, with stronger gusts. This was not good for any kind of fishing, but for a group of fly fishermen looking for bonefish, it was terrible.

That evening I gathered the small group before dinner and suggested they think of fishing some of the creeks and rivers in the area. They offer great protection against the wind and a variety of fish species to chase. But the group was set on bonefish. They had thought about bones for months, and they couldn’t give them up. I understood.

4+ Piece Rods: Don't fear the Ferrule

  • By: Zach Matthews

FACT: Fly fishers love travel. Unfortunate fact: Travel is a lot more difficult than it was 10 years ago, thanks mostly to international terrorism. In fact, I’ll never forget the time I watched a gentleman heading out on a cast-and-blast trip trying to negotiate security at Miami International Airport. He had forgotten that he had recently worn his travel vest while doing some upland shooting. Thanks to a little gunpowder residue in his pockets, he was locked inside MIA’s shiny new “puffer” bomb-sniffing device, while red lights flashed and security sprinted into the area (to the great amusement of his fellow anglers).

Travel Fly-Tying Vises

  • By: Buzz Bryson
  • Photography by: Aaron Goodis
Travel Vises

There are two primary considerations for any fly-tying vise: It must hold the hook snugly, and it must allow you to tie a fly easily, i.e., the vise can’t get in the way. The only practical reason to buy a travel vise is that it is smaller—lighter and more compact—than your primary vise, while maintaining an acceptable level of function. It’s that simple.

Angling Duffels

  • By: David Hughes
a0197479_lg.jpg

Once you’ve booked that trip of a lifetime, you almost immediately bump into the twin set of questions: “What do I take?” and, “What’s the best thing to take it in?”

Trips rarely get ruined by any absence of gear; don’t worry about that, unless you have size 14 feet and forget your size 14 wading boots. If that happens your anatomical predisposition may prove troublesome; for most of us, lodges carry anything you may have left at home, within the range of averages for fitting and gear. Size 14 boots don’t fit the average.