Domestic

California Spring

  • By: Val Atkinson
  • Photography by: Val Atkinson
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California may be the promised land for many, including all those snowbirds who ride out winter in Palm Desert, and the yearlong sun seekers living large and scantily clad in SoCal, but eastern and northern California feel a lot like the rest of the country during winter, which makes spring a blessing when it arrives.

Trails To Glory

  • By:
  • Photography by: Brian O'Keefe
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Seven hundred lakes beckon anglers from the Washington Cascades Alpine Lakes Wilderness. Some of the best, like UpperWildcat Lake, can be accessed off of I-90 at Snoqualmie Pass, which is located just an hour east of Seattle.

Trails To Glory

  • By: Dave McCoy
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Washington is home to the magnificent Pacific steelhead and five species of salmon that have brought anglers to the Evergreen State for more than 100 years. All the famous anglers, from Roderick Haig-Brown to Steve Raymond to Enos Bradner, et al., have thrown lines here trying to raise those massive steelhead and salmon to flies.

Trails To Glory

  • By: Michael Salomone
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Gore Canyon

Colorado

by Michael Salomone

Trails To Glory

  • By: Greg Vinci
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Owens Gorge

Northern California

by Greg Vinci

 

Trails To Glory

  • By: Jeff Erickson
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Northeast Yellowstone

Wyoming

By Jeff Erickson

Going Solo For Wyoming Cutthroats

  • By: Jeff Erickson
  • Photography by: Jeff Erickson
  • and Greg Thomas
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You can chase cutthroats on easily accessed streams, such as the Snake, near Jackson, or head out from there to reach remote, wilder waters that are full of cutthroats and are visited by few anglers.

Bass in the West

  • By: Kirk Deeter
  • , Ralph Bartholdt
  • , Brian O'Keefe
  • and Jeff Erickson
  • Photography by: Tim Romano
  • , John Sherman
  • , Ralph Bartholdt
  • , Brian O'Keefe
  • and Jeff Erickson
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Sandpoint, idaho—calvin fuller has a pet bass that weighs a pound and a half and eats chicken burritos. He hooks it during lunch breaks less than a block from Sandpoint, Idaho’s main drag, under the watchful eyes of coffee-sippers at Starbucks.

Fuller, a local outfitter who operates the area’s only fly shop, cuts between storefronts and down an alley to reach the banks of Sand Creek, then casts a bug-eye streamer. I watch the fat line he’s throwing off a Sage Bass Series rod and it goes tight. He and his pet play again.

Spring Steel on Idaho's Upper Salmon River

  • By: Greg Thomas
  • Photography by: Greg Thomas
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I’ve created a problem for myself; I am a steelhead junkie who lives 500 miles from salt water, in a state where those big sea-run rainbows don’t even exist.

I like where I live—Missoula, Montana—and I’m quite sure this is where I will raise my daughters. But in the back of my mind there’s this idea to endear a Canadian scarlet, gain dual citizenship (plus healthcare, right), and move north, to Campbell River, Bella Coola or, even better, to Smithers or Terrace, British Columbia, where the greatest race of steelhead still pours into the Skeena, Babine, Kispiox, Kitimat and Sustut rivers. That’s the glory list, and I could see myself fishing those waters a couple hundred days a year while pretending that I care about hockey.

Coasters

  • By: John Gierach
  • Photography by: Bob White
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I came to know about Michigan’s upper peninsula through the writing of Ernest Hemingway, John Voelker (a.k.a. Robert Traver) and, later, Jim Harrison and others. It may be a coincidence that many of the writers I like have a connection to this northernmost landmass of Michigan that, until the completion of the Mackinac Bridge in 1957, was so isolated it could only be reached from the rest of the state by boat.

Or maybe it’s just that the region naturally produces stories filled with tea-colored trout streams, beaver ponds hidden in swamps, and small towns where rules are gracefully bent by those with the right intentions. Whatever the reason, the UP is enshrined alongside the Serengeti, the Yukon Territory and Paris as a place made romantic by virtue of appearing in books. Which is to say, I am an innocent victim of literature.