An Angle On Art

  • By: Bob White
  • Illustrations by: Becca Schlaff
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Becca Schlaff’s Tributes to the Colors of Fish

 

Angle on Art

  • By: Bob White
  • Illustrations by: Travis Sylvester
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Travis Sylvester is the only artist I know who works exclusively in colored pencils, and I must confess . . . I know very little about the medium, or the process he’s chosen.

Short Casts

  • By: Bob White
  • Illustrations by: Galen Mercer
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Galen Mercer doesn’t think of himself as an angling artist. In fact, during a recent examination of a quarter century of his work, Mercer was surprised to find that, of the hundreds of paintings he reviewed, only three or four actually contained anglers, and fewer still included fish. “I’ve always been far more interested in the sporting environs than the particulars,” he explained. “Except for scale, I’ve never felt compelled to ‘humanize’ a landscape. Quite the opposite.”

An Angle On Art

  • By: Bob White
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Most sporting art, especially angling art, has a practical purpose or function. Painters, photographers and printmakers try to capture a moment in time and preserve memories. Sculptors recreate objects cherished by anglers, be they fish or fly. Rod makers, net makers, boat builders and fly tiers create the tools with which we pursue our passion.

Presentation

  • Photography by: Todd Kaplan
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Subject: During early evenings in June along the banks of south-central Idaho’s Silver Creek, brown drake spinners collect en masse. In response, the creek’s largest brown trout appear from their cutbank lairs to inhale them. Most creek devotees say there’s no better time to catch a five-pound trout on a dry fly.